Hollywood Coaching • Career Coach Los Angeles, Life Coach, Executive Business Coach

The New Hollywood Leader

Life Coaching in the New York Times - Again

by David Brownstein

Big article in the New York Times about LIfe Coaching. This one asking the musical question of whther you should have a life before becoming a life coach. Or more specifically it was talking about the many "young" life coaches in their 20's and whether someone so "young" had enough life experience to "coach" someone "older."

Here's what I posted as a comment on that article. 

"I'm a life coach, so obviously i believe in the value of the process. What seems worth pointing out here is that coaching is actually more about listening to our clients talk then telling them what to do.

Actually, listening well is a skill and something most of us don't get from friends, families and coworkers. When a coach is listening well, the client begins to notice themselves what matters to them and things become clearer to them. Then the simplest question will help the client take actions of their own design."

So congrats to all you new coaches out there whether "young" or "old."

"ARE YOU FEELIN' LUCKY?" - Dustin Hoffman wants to know

by David Brownstein

"ARE YOU FEELIN' LUCKY?"

This is the question Dustin Hoffman’s character, “Ace" Bernstein, asks his grandson at the end of the season and series finale of “Luck.”

The excellent and recently cancelled show from David Milch, Michael Mann and HBO, that is.

LUCKY IN LOVE? 

First, and obviously, I loved this show. I found the writing and acting so good and deep and rich I started to thank the gods of television for sending something so enjoyable and for the gift of seeing Dustin Hoffman’s amazing character and such a nuanced, emotionally accessible character.

That is, an emotionally accessible actor, playing a emotionally un-accessible character who is just recently released from jail and knows that jail changed him, and that he’s getting older and that he has to do things differently, but he’s a creature of habit, but he’s got these new awareness’ and . . . anyhow. A great character fleshed out by one of our greatest actors.

THINGS CHANGE

And, like life at the racetrack, things change and are out of our control.

As “Ace” says to his grandson (whose misbehaviors let to “Ace” spending 3 years in jail to protect him) “Sometimes you get dealt a hand you don’t like. The question is how you’re going to play it.”

In a turn not unlike the world portrayed on the show, Luck’s cancellation occurred when a horse died during production of the recently begun second season. Also apparently two horses had died during production of the first season.

AND CHANGE AGAIN

Also, adding to the strange irony for me was that a new assistant I had just hired got a job working on the set of “Luck” suddenly and left my employ.

My great new assistant leaving to work on my favorite show, which then got cancelled two weeks later? Weird.

Such are the twists, turns, trials and tribulations of life and work in Hollywood in 2012.

BUT HERE'S THE THING

TV is very much ALIVE these days and this is where the work is and possibly the best storytelling around today.  

You may have begun your career thinking you wanted to be in the movie business. Great. Keep doing it.

But if you want to be working these days it’s wise to broaden your scope to include the wacky, fickle and prosperous world of TV.

THE TALENT THING

The Top Talent is working in TV, some of the best stories, the best writers, actors, directors, crew etc.

Reality TV isn’t going away, but scripted is alive. Every month we hear of new cable channels doing scripted TV. The major networks are still at it, and soon we’ll be seeing what Netflix, Google, YouTube and Apple have to say about original programming.

Let alone the independent entrepreneurs who decide to just do their own thing. (Did you hear about Louis CK’s independent comedy downloadable concert for $4.99?)

BUSINESS OR HOBBY?

I heard Mitchell Block, the documentary film-maker turned distributor sum it up this way on a panel last year. “Right now features are a hobby. Television is a business.”

And so for me.

I’m turning my professional attention to the TV world. When the writers strike happened a few years ago, followed by the fear of an actor’s strike, combined with tanking of the economy, there was all this strange talk of the death of Television.

SMALL SCREEN?

But as Network President I heard on an HRTS panel said a year or so ago, “We’ve realized that our job is to create hits. We don’t care about the size of your screen.”

So while I’m continuing to work with clients in all areas of the entertainment industry ecosystem I’m turning my focus to TV.

It’s where the work and money is for my friends and clients, and it’s one of the only parts of Hollywood where there’s a motivation to keep a team together.

KEEP IT TOGETHER?

Consider this: The goal of a TV show, once it goes beyond a pilot, is to get to 100 episodes so that it can be syndicated. That takes about 5 years. Thus, the company needs to keep its team together.

While yes, on one hand, anyone is replaceable, from showrunner to major star, all parties seem to agree that it would be nice to keep the major creative players playing well with each other.

So my goals and mission for Hollywood Coaching are these:

  • --Help writers develop their career and leadership skills so that they can be more powerful in the writers room and in their communications with their team of executives, their actors and their crew.
  • --Help executives succeed by helping them manage their shows, their creative teams and their bosses.
  • --Help producers succeed by helping them reduce conflict wherever they may arise in the production/development food chain and to learn the skills for managing, reducing and facilitating conflicts and delays due to creative differences.

 

"ARE YOU FEELIN' LUCKY?" - Dustin Hoffman wants to know

by David Brownstein

"ARE YOU FEELIN' LUCKY?"

This is the question Dustin Hoffman’s character, “Ace" Bernstein, asks his grandson at the end of the season and series finale of “Luck.”

The excellent and recently cancelled show from David Milch, Michael Mann and HBO, that is.

LUCKY IN LOVE? 

First, and obviously, I loved this show. I found the writing and acting so good and deep and rich I started to thank the gods of television for sending something so enjoyable and for the gift of seeing Dustin Hoffman’s amazing character and such a nuanced, emotionally accessible character.

That is, an emotionally accessible actor, playing a emotionally un-accessible character who is just recently released from jail and knows that jail changed him, and that he’s getting older and that he has to do things differently, but he’s a creature of habit, but he’s got these new awareness’ and . . . anyhow. A great character fleshed out by one of our greatest actors.

THINGS CHANGE

And, like life at the racetrack, things change and are out of our control.

As “Ace” says to his grandson (whose misbehaviors let to “Ace” spending 3 years in jail to protect him) “Sometimes you get dealt a hand you don’t like. The question is how you’re going to play it.”

In a turn not unlike the world portrayed on the show, Luck’s cancellation occurred when a horse died during production of the recently begun second season. Also apparently two horses had died during production of the first season.

AND CHANGE AGAIN

Also, adding to the strange irony for me was that a new assistant I had just hired got a job working on the set of “Luck” suddenly and left my employ.

My great new assistant leaving to work on my favorite show, which then got cancelled two weeks later? Weird.

Such are the twists, turns, trials and tribulations of life and work in Hollywood in 2012.

BUT HERE'S THE THING

TV is very much ALIVE these days and this is where the work is and possibly the best storytelling around today.  

You may have begun your career thinking you wanted to be in the movie business. Great. Keep doing it.

But if you want to be working these days it’s wise to broaden your scope to include the wacky, fickle and prosperous world of TV.

THE TALENT THING

The Top Talent is working in TV, some of the best stories, the best writers, actors, directors, crew etc.

Reality TV isn’t going away, but scripted is alive. Every month we hear of new cable channels doing scripted TV. The major networks are still at it, and soon we’ll be seeing what Netflix, Google, YouTube and Apple have to say about original programming.

Let alone the independent entrepreneurs who decide to just do their own thing. (Did you hear about Louis CK’s independent comedy downloadable concert for $4.99?)

BUSINESS OR HOBBY?

I heard Mitchell Block, the documentary film-maker turned distributor sum it up this way on a panel last year. “Right now features are a hobby. Television is a business.”

And so for me.

I’m turning my professional attention to the TV world. When the writers strike happened a few years ago, followed by the fear of an actor’s strike, combined with tanking of the economy, there was all this strange talk of the death of Television.

SMALL SCREEN?

But as Network President I heard on an HRTS panel said a year or so ago, “We’ve realized that our job is to create hits. We don’t care about the size of your screen.”

So while I’m continuing to work with clients in all areas of the entertainment industry ecosystem I’m turning my focus to TV.

It’s where the work and money is for my friends and clients, and it’s one of the only parts of Hollywood where there’s a motivation to keep a team together.

KEEP IT TOGETHER?

Consider this: The goal of a TV show, once it goes beyond a pilot, is to get to 100 episodes so that it can be syndicated. That takes about 5 years. Thus, the company needs to keep its team together.

While yes, on one hand, anyone is replaceable, from showrunner to major star, all parties seem to agree that it would be nice to keep the major creative players playing well with each other.

So my goals and mission for Hollywood Coaching are these:

  • --Help writers develop their career and leadership skills so that they can be more powerful in the writers room and in their communications with their team of executives, their actors and their crew.
  • --Help executives succeed by helping them manage their shows, their creative teams and their bosses.
  • --Help producers succeed by helping them reduce conflict wherever they may arise in the production/development food chain and to learn the skills for managing, reducing and facilitating conflicts and delays due to creative differences.

 

CREATIVE CROSS TO BEAR?

by David Brownstein

A few weeks ago I heard Gregg Allman interviewed by the co-author of his new autobiography My Cross To Bear.  I was a fan of the Allman Brothers Band when I was in high school, inspired and amazed by the dual lead guitars of Duane Allman and Dicky Betts, the melodic and driving bass of Berry Oakley and the gravely voice of Gregg.

I wasn’t paying much attention to lyrics at that time, being more of a guitar/bass/groove/riff guy. It barely registered to me that they were really sort of a blues band. I knew they played blues songs but their music was so different than what I thought the blues was that it did not register. Or matter.

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